Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.

Colorado Composites Carbon Mountain Bike Rims

Colorado Composites Carbon Mountain Bike Rims

I'll be frank, I have a problem with buying bike stuff. You'd think a new bike would calm the addiction, but nope, a new bike is just another reason to buy more bits. While I've made minor changes here and there to the Yeti SB6, the new wheelset is the biggest improvement.

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While I'll admit a new wheelset wasn't a necessity, it's still nice to throw some lighter wheels into the mix, especially for those days when I pretend to be a climber. I knew I wanted something custom, preferably with a bit of color for a nice pop. I had ordered custom wheels from Colorado Cyclist in the past and was pleased with the result. My previous wheelset build was for my bikepacking bike and they've held up well after nearly a year of abuse. Colorado Cyclist responds to email quickly, builds quickly, and ships quickly - I'm guessing the super fast shipping time has something to do with the fact that we're just one state south of them, but that works! All in all, I'd highly recommend them for any of your wheel building needs. 

For this build, I knew I wanted carbon rims and while there were a number of options available, I ended up going with the Colorado Cyclist's house brand, Colorado Composites. I'm sure some might perceive this as a risk, considering there isn't much news about them on the internet, but knowing the experience I had with my previous build and the service I received, I figured it would be a risk worth taking. There are plenty of rumors on message boards that these could be a custom batch of Light Bicycle rims, they could be rebranded Nox rims...hard saying. I basically compared weights and internal/external widths, which were all comparable to other brands.

From Colorado Cyclist Upgrade your ride with the new and affordable Colorado Composites Carbon Rim. We designed this carbon rim to handle any discipline of MTB riding, from fast XC racing to the rough world of All-Mountain riding. Offered in two sizes and widths, the Colorado Composites Carbon Rim has you covered for every riding situation. After extensive testing, we are confident that the Colorado Composites Carbon Rim provides the ultimate in stiffness, durability and tubeless compatibility at the lowest weight possible for trail riding; all at a competitive price point. Rim features 35mm external width, with a 29mm internal. 2 year warranty.  Size: 27.5-inch External/Internal Dimension: 35/29 mm Weight: 440 grams Drilling: 32 hole Tubeless Compatible Disc Only

From Colorado Cyclist

Upgrade your ride with the new and affordable Colorado Composites Carbon Rim. We designed this carbon rim to handle any discipline of MTB riding, from fast XC racing to the rough world of All-Mountain riding. Offered in two sizes and widths, the Colorado Composites Carbon Rim has you covered for every riding situation. After extensive testing, we are confident that the Colorado Composites Carbon Rim provides the ultimate in stiffness, durability and tubeless compatibility at the lowest weight possible for trail riding; all at a competitive price point. Rim features 35mm external width, with a 29mm internal. 2 year warranty. 

Size: 27.5-inch
External/Internal Dimension: 35/29 mm
Weight: 440 grams
Drilling: 32 hole
Tubeless Compatible
Disc Only

Sure it would have been fun to throw some ENVE Seventy 30s laced to Chris King hubs on this bad boy, but I resisted the urge. I love ENVE and I love Chris King, and that's what I'm currently running on my road bike, I just found it to be overkill for this build. I also have a strange infatuation with Hope mountain bike components. I opted for Hope hubs on the bikepacking bike build and have been very pleased, so opted to stick with that option for the Yeti.

In all reality, hub color was probably my biggest dilemma. I've done purple hubs before (and pink for that matter) so I considered toning it down a smidge and opting for orange but with the latest crazy of orange Fox forks for the pros, I decided against it - didn't want anyone thinking I was trying to be something I'm not. Also, purple just works with the Yeti turquoise, so here we are. Anyway, I'm rambling...are you still reading this? Sorry. 

One last thing while I still ramble...to all of you folks using blue custom bits on your turquoise Yeti, stop. The colors are off and it just doesn't work. Pick a different accent color. Try purple!

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As I've said, I'm a Hope fanboy. I realize there are better hubs out there, but for the price and color options, I don't think there's a better deal at the moment. I've yet to have an issue with them on either of my bikes so no complaints so far. Throw in the fact that they sound like a wad of bees coming down the hill and it's a fairly easy sell. I finished off the build with standard 14g spokes and purple nipples. I considered a 14g/15g and even a 14g/16g spoke and might have opted for the option had they been for a XC rig, but knowing they'd be put through their paces on some chunkier stuff, 14g seemed to be the best options. What's a few grams anyway?

For now, I'm still running the stock SRAM Guide R brakes and Centerline discs, but in time hope to update the brakes and discs to Hope's as well...and you betcha, in purple!

As you can see below, the wheels do suffer from the typical sealant leak around the nipples. I'm not sure what causes this, but I've had the issue on every MTB wheelset I've ever owned, so I don't fault the wheels for this. I have read that this is more of a problem with Stans sealant than some others, so perhaps I should switch up my sealants and see what happens. It honestly doesn't bother me all that much, just gives me a reason to wash my bike more often.

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One negative of the rims is the inability to remove the Colorado Composite logo. This is not a big deal for me as I consider the branding to be fairly minimal, but can see where others might want a completely unbadged black wheel.

Seems like a strange warning for a disc-only wheel, no?

Seems like a strange warning for a disc-only wheel, no?

I also usually never keep the valve cap on the stem (I've read the rules!) however, I like the stealth look of the black stem and the cap covering the raw colored valve core. I've also read that with tubeless setups, protecting the valve core is a good thing, one good knock by a rock or a root and your valve core could be hosed, meaning you're going to have a bad time...and either walk out, or use that tube that's been bouncing around your bag for 2 years. So judge me if you'd like, I don't mind, I'm not and never will be "pro" so the valve caps stay on. 

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NBD and All the Feels

NBD and All the Feels

Gravel Ride on the Apache Trail

Gravel Ride on the Apache Trail